The tips for Solo Travelers – Part 1

0
334

Solo traveling is so developing in recent years, many people (both men and women) want to take a solo travel journey. However, solo traveling may cause many dangerous risks. Therefore, we offer the following necessary tips for solo travelers on how to travel alone successfully. Ready to make the most of your first solitary outing?

>> Taj Mahal Travel Tips

1. Know your strengths

Are you a sociable person who wants to be in the middle of everything? You might go crazy if you can’t communicate, so head for where you speak the language. Or, barring that go somewhere with very few tourists. If you’re more of an introvert and prefer to observe a culture, forget the language barrier and go for passive entertainment. Vibrant cities are perfect for this, especially ones with good café cultures. Paris is classic, but other former French colonies, such as Vietnam, are also great for sitting and people-watching, all for the price of a coffee.

2. Sleep around

Sleep around

Look for room rentals in an apartment, which gives an automatic connection with residents when you’re travelling alone. Even if your landlord doesn’t take you out on the town, you’ll at least scoop up a few local tips. Try online bulletin boards in your destination, room-rental sites like Airbnb and crash-pad networks like Couchsurfing. Bonus: as a solo traveller, you have tons of options to choose from. Hostels are of course ready-made for solo travellers, but you might wind up spending more time with other tourists than with locals.

3. Play the oddball card

In much of the world, solo travellers – and single people in general – are seen as strange, even a bit unfortunate. But travelling alone, you might find yourself the recipient of generous invitations to people’s houses for dinner. So don’t feel bad – just roll with it, and show off your free-agent status by offering to take a family’s photo at a big sight, for instance, or sitting near a chatty gang at a bar.

4. Just say no

Sometimes, especially in more hospitable and foreigner-fascinated cultures like Egypt, the attention you get travelling solo can be a little intense. Learn how to say “no, thank you” in the local language, as well as “absolutely not” – plus the local nonverbal gesture for no, which is often more effective than both. Also have local help numbers, such as the tourist police, programmed in your phone. You’ll probably never need them, but just knowing you have them can give you the confidence to deal with awkward situations.

5. Pack a book

Pack a book

A good book, a magazine or even just postcards to write or your travel journal to jot in – are all legitimate activities at a bar or restaurant if you get to feeling a little bored/lonely/exposed, so carry one of them with you at all times. And as a last resort there’s always fiddling with your smartphone.

6. Take photos

Making photography a mission, even if it’s just little odd details you notice about a place, gives a little structure to your day. And you will notice more odd details, because you’ll have the time and attention to look around. Your friends at home will appreciate your perspective and the story that comes with it.

7. Eat big

Eat big

You might be tempted to live on fast food, just to avoid awkward restaurant situations. Don’t. In fact, fancy establishments are fantastic places to dine alone. Waiters are happy to help solo diners who smile and say, “I made a special trip just to eat here. What do you recommend?” Social folks might want to eat at the bar, but there’s no shame in taking a table for two.

8. Get an early start

If the thought of bar-hopping alone makes you die a little inside, just recast your day. Wake up early, enjoy a leisurely breakfast (when all the good stuff is still available on the hotel buffet) and head out for parks, museums and other daytime-only activities. If you pack your day full enough, you’ll be ready for bed by 9pm.

…to be continiued